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languages:irish_in_ireland [2020/03/24 09:06]
ydwine [Educational legislation:]
languages:irish_in_ireland [2020/03/24 10:12]
ydwine [Preschool education]
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 ====== Language and education legislation ====== ====== Language and education legislation ======
 ===== History of language education: ===== ===== History of language education: =====
-Inscriptions in Ogham from the 4th and 5th centuries are the earliest known forms of the Irish language, pre-dating Old Irish. The period between the 6th and 9th century saw the flourishing of Ireland’s Golden Age. This early period also provided a variety of literature in Old Irish which is considered the earliest vernacular example in Europe. The cumulative effect of colonisation,​ plantation and suppression,​ particularly from the 16th century onwards, led to the elimination of the Irish-speaking aristocracy and their institutions. Additionally,​ catastrophic famine, emigration and epidemics decimated the Irish-speaking rural indigenous population during the 19th century, all factors which led to a language shift to English. Language restoration efforts by voluntary organisations began in the early 20th century (([[http://​www.mercator-research.eu/​fileadmin/​mercator/​dossiers_pdf/​irish_in_ireland_2nd.pdf|Mercator Regional Dossier: The Irish language in education in the Republic of Ireland 2nd]])). With the emergence of the free state in 1921, Irish was made the national language, and outside the Gaeltacht, or traditional heartland of the language, education was seen as the main tool in language revival. In the 1980'​s ​only 3% of secondary students were receiving Irish-medium education. ((Edwards, Vic, ‘Education and the Development of Early Childhood Bilingualism’,​ in Voces Diversae: Lesser-Used Language Education in Europe, ed. by Dónall Ó Riagáin, Belfast Studies in Language, Culture and Politics, 15 (Belfast: Cló Ollscoil na Banríona, 2006)+Inscriptions in Ogham from the 4th and 5th centuries are the earliest known forms of the Irish language, pre-dating Old Irish. The period between the 6th and 9th century saw the flourishing of Ireland’s Golden Age. This early period also provided a variety of literature in Old Irish which is considered the earliest vernacular example in Europe. The cumulative effect of colonisation,​ plantation and suppression,​ particularly from the 16th century onwards, led to the elimination of the Irish-speaking aristocracy and their institutions. Additionally,​ catastrophic famine, emigration and epidemics decimated the Irish-speaking rural indigenous population during the 19th century, all factors which led to a language shift to English. Language restoration efforts by voluntary organisations began in the early 20th century (([[http://​www.mercator-research.eu/​fileadmin/​mercator/​dossiers_pdf/​irish_in_ireland_2nd.pdf|Mercator Regional Dossier: The Irish language in education in the Republic of Ireland 2nd]])). With the emergence of the free state in 1921, Irish was made the national language, and outside the Gaeltacht, or traditional heartland of the language, education was seen as the main tool in language revival. In the 1980's 3% of secondary students were receiving Irish-medium education. ((Edwards, Vic, ‘Education and the Development of Early Childhood Bilingualism’,​ in Voces Diversae: Lesser-Used Language Education in Europe, ed. by Dónall Ó Riagáin, Belfast Studies in Language, Culture and Politics, 15 (Belfast: Cló Ollscoil na Banríona, 2006)
 )) ))
  
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 === Ongoing projects === === Ongoing projects ===
-  * The National Council for Curriculum and Assessment ​ developed AISTEAR (Journey) in 2009, the Early Childhood Curriculum Framework, for children from birth to six years of age. It is based on four themes and is directed at practitioners and parents. [[http://​www.ncca.ie/​en/​Curriculum_and_Assessment/​Early_Childhood_and_Primary_Education/​Early_Childhood_Education/​]] 
  
-  * Comhar na Naíonraí Gaeltachta (Partnership of Gaeltacht Naíonraí) in collaboration with the Dublin Institute of Technology, ​has developed a specific curriculum for language enrichment and development with Gaeltacht children, entitled Loinnir (Radiance/​Brightness),​ and has published a number of books and CDs featuring rhymes and songs from local traditions. ​+  * [[http://​www.comharnaionrai.ie/​english.php|Comhar na Naíonraí Gaeltachta]] (Partnership of Gaeltacht Naíonraí) ​provides early years services (for naíonraí, crèches, breakfast clubs, afterschool services and parent and toddler groups ​in the Gaeltacht areas as well as administration,​ support and training) through the medium of Irish. \\ In collaboration with the Dublin Institute of Technology, ​CNNG developed a specific curriculum for language enrichment and development with Gaeltacht children, entitled Loinnir (Radiance/​Brightness),​ and has published a number of books and CDs featuring rhymes and songs from local traditions. ​ 
 + 
 +  * The National Council for Curriculum and Assessment ​ developed [[https://​ncca.ie/​en/​early-childhood/​aistear/​|AISTEAR]] (Journey) in 2009, the Early Childhood Curriculum Framework, for children from birth to six years of age. It is based on four themes and is directed at practitioners and parents.  
 + 
 ===== Primary education ===== ===== Primary education =====
  
languages/irish_in_ireland.txt · Last modified: 2020/09/08 10:36 by ydwine

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