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languages:griko_in_italy

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languages:griko_in_italy [2020/11/30 10:10]
pariszeikos [Italiot-Greek varieties]
languages:griko_in_italy [2020/12/03 11:42] (current)
ydwine
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-====== Griko in Italy ======+====== Griko in Italy ======
  
 ==== Language designations:​ ==== ==== Language designations:​ ====
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 Griko should not be confused with Greko, also known as Grekanico, despite both being  Italiot-Greek languages.Griko and Greko are mutually intelligible due to both languages being derived from Greek however, the primary difference between these two languages is that Griko is spoken in Salento while Greko is spoken in Calabria. Furthermore,​ they have some differences regarding their grammar and the languages they have come into contact with throughout history. Griko has been in language contact with Italian and Salentino while Greko has been in language contact with Calabrian and Italian. Despite both Griko and Greko being derived from Greek, they both developed independently. (( Ralli, A. (2019). Greek in contact with Romance. Retrieved 19 October 2020, from https://​www.academia.edu/​35224790/​Greek_in_contact_with_Romance)) Griko should not be confused with Greko, also known as Grekanico, despite both being  Italiot-Greek languages.Griko and Greko are mutually intelligible due to both languages being derived from Greek however, the primary difference between these two languages is that Griko is spoken in Salento while Greko is spoken in Calabria. Furthermore,​ they have some differences regarding their grammar and the languages they have come into contact with throughout history. Griko has been in language contact with Italian and Salentino while Greko has been in language contact with Calabrian and Italian. Despite both Griko and Greko being derived from Greek, they both developed independently. (( Ralli, A. (2019). Greek in contact with Romance. Retrieved 19 October 2020, from https://​www.academia.edu/​35224790/​Greek_in_contact_with_Romance))
  
-{{:​languages:​student_sheets:​240px-grikospeakingcommunitiestodayv4.png?​400|}}+{{:​languages:​240px-grikospeakingcommunitiestodayv4.png?​nolink&400|}}
  
 <sup> The image shows the speaker communities of Griko in Salento and Greko in Calabria((GrikoSpeakingCommunitiesTodayV4. (8 March 2006). In //​Wikipedia//​. Retrieved 21 October 2020, from https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Griko_dialect#/​media/​File:​GrikoSpeakingCommunitiesTodayV4.png)).</​sup>​ <sup> The image shows the speaker communities of Griko in Salento and Greko in Calabria((GrikoSpeakingCommunitiesTodayV4. (8 March 2006). In //​Wikipedia//​. Retrieved 21 October 2020, from https://​en.wikipedia.org/​wiki/​Griko_dialect#/​media/​File:​GrikoSpeakingCommunitiesTodayV4.png)).</​sup>​
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 The grandparents/​elderly (N) speak Griko amongst themselves while they use Salentino as well as Italian, with incomplete knowledge, with the parents (G) and the children (F). Parents (G) use Salentino to communicate with the grandparents/​elderly (N) as the parents have incomplete or passive knowledge of Griko, which they rarely or almost never use, while with the children (F), they use either Italian or Salentino. As the children (F) do not speak or understand Griko, they use Italian or Salentino with the parents (G) and Salentino with the grandparents/​elderly (N). However, the scheme represents the linguistic repertoire in Salento, it does tend to vary from speaker to speaker and family to family. ((Douri, A., & De Santis, D. (2015). Griko and Modern Greek in Grecia Salentina: An Overview. L'​idomeneo,​ 19, 187-198. doi: 0.1285/​i20380313v19p187)) The grandparents/​elderly (N) speak Griko amongst themselves while they use Salentino as well as Italian, with incomplete knowledge, with the parents (G) and the children (F). Parents (G) use Salentino to communicate with the grandparents/​elderly (N) as the parents have incomplete or passive knowledge of Griko, which they rarely or almost never use, while with the children (F), they use either Italian or Salentino. As the children (F) do not speak or understand Griko, they use Italian or Salentino with the parents (G) and Salentino with the grandparents/​elderly (N). However, the scheme represents the linguistic repertoire in Salento, it does tend to vary from speaker to speaker and family to family. ((Douri, A., & De Santis, D. (2015). Griko and Modern Greek in Grecia Salentina: An Overview. L'​idomeneo,​ 19, 187-198. doi: 0.1285/​i20380313v19p187))
  
-{{:​languages:​student_sheets:​screenshot_2020-10-19_at_12.45.35.png?​400|}}+{{:​languages:​screenshot_2020-10-19_at_12.45.35.png?​nolink&400|}}
  
 <sup> The image shows the linguistic repertoire in Salento of the grandparents/​elderly (N), the parents (G), and the children (F) <sup> The image shows the linguistic repertoire in Salento of the grandparents/​elderly (N), the parents (G), and the children (F)
languages/griko_in_italy.1606727426.txt.gz · Last modified: 2020/11/30 10:10 by pariszeikos

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